Skip to main content

About your Search

20121223
20121223
STATION
CSPAN2 18
CSPAN 17
CNNW 15
SFGTV2 14
KGO (ABC) 7
WBAL (NBC) 7
SFGTV 6
MSNBCW 5
FBC 4
WJLA (ABC) 4
WRC (NBC) 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
WTTG 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 144
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 145 (some duplicates have been removed)
's look at the facts. according to the u.n.'s office on drugs and crime, the u.s. gun homicide rate is 30 times that of france or australia. it is 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries. why is that? if psychology is the main course, we should see that we have 12 times as many psychologically disturbed people as the average. we don't. in fact, america takes mental disorders seriously, treats them and doesn't stigmatize them. we do better in this area than most of our peers. is america's popular culture much worse than other rich countries? not really since it's largely the same popular culture worldwide. england and wales are exposed to cultural influences as the u.s. yet, their rate of gun homicide is some 3% of ours. the japanese are at the cutting edge of the world of video games, yet the u.n. puts their gun homicide rate at close to zero. why? well, they have one of the most restrictive series of gun laws in the world. when looking internationally, it is obvious that the one feature of america that would explain why we have so much more gun violence than the re
's analytics and joining me in studio is christine romans. the gdp for the u.s. grew at 3.1% over the summer. that's more than double the rate of the previous quarter. you can see the chart, it's been choppy, but it looks like we're going in the right direction. america's economy is gaining pace, doing better than expected. and we've been saying the 2013 could be the year of a real economic renaissance in the united states or at least the beginning of one. talk to me about the consequences to our prosperity if washington doesn't reach a deal. >> the consequences are not good. so what the numbers are telling you is that the private sector is healing. and if the private sector were left to its own devices, it would heal faster. unfortunately, washington is getting in the way. and what we find out this week, ali, is that the problem is not just a lack of trust between democrats and republicans, we found out that the republicans themselves can't unite. which means that the cooperative solution that you need to solve this country's headwinds becomes much more difficult, which means that the priva
at the state department for inadequate security at the u.s. consulate in benghazi before the september 11th attack that killed ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. in testimony before congress this week, two top advisors to secretary of state hillary clinton vowed to do better and to improve security at u.s. diplomatic posts around the world. clinton herself was suppose today appear, but reportedly recovering from a concussion and testifying in january. and we're back with bret stevens, also joins us, so, bret. what did we learn this week about the attack that's new? >> let me correct you, this was not a scathing report. this was a report that said there were failures in middle management. it says in its last sentence that no disciplinary actions are warranted. four officials did resign. he gives us a timeline of what happened and by now all of us know happened in benghazi, it tells us that the cia had no information about impending attacks even though it had officers on the ground. it's know the a scathing report. it's a whitewash report. >> paul: you would go so far as to s
is the september 11 tax on the u.s. mission and an x in benghazi. -- attacks on the u.s. mission and annex in benghazi. three other officials were placed on administrative leave. it may or may not be disciplined. are you satisfied that the investigation is done? >> the most important thing is not whether or not the president called it a terrorist attack or anything like that. the most important thing is to nsure that no, benghazi's happen in the future. there were plenty of mistakes to report. in the future, that the coordination is better and we do not make the same mistakes. that is the most important thing. it was a mistake for mitt romney to use this as a political thing during the campaign. i think foreign policy should be bipartisan to the extent that is possible, and in a time of tragedy, americans need to rally around -- rally together and not try to use it for political, partisan purposes. we need to dissect it, see what happened and make sure it never happens again. there were recommendations that were made, and secretary clinton accepts all of them. we have to make sure that our
of the u.s. gun moll goes on television to defend his call for armed guards in every school. they are helping keep kids out of trouble in south africa. welcome to the program. all they were trying to do was buy bread. this has turned into a tragedy in central syria. dozens of people are said to have died at the bakery was hit by a government air strike. this is as they arrived in damascus for more talks aimed at ending the violence. >> panic, chaos, anger. this is the aftermath of what the opposition says was an air strike carried out by a syrian fighter jet. the observatory for human rights says those killed and wounded were queueing outside a bakery. only five days ago it was under the control of government forces. in the rebels recently opened a new battlefront and this region of hama. territorial gains mean little when the states still have superior firepower to strike back. the information minister said the government is willing to engage a in dialogue but the other side is not. >> i have a general advice to those powers that reject. time is getting short. curry and mov
. although the u.s. could extend its nuclear umbrella to other nations and there so that obviates that need, but still isn't deterrent working through the cold war something that can also be applied to iran or a number of other nuclear regimes? >> the short answer is question. deterrents can work and of course it did work. it becomes harder many on many as compared with one-on-one. the u.s. and the soviet union became quite experienced in how to handle mutually assured destruction if you like. or mutual deterrents. when you have a number of -- many nations butting up against each other physically essentially, and with much less experience in handling the issue of deterrents, i think the risks become higher. and if as you suggest proliferation is likely to become more widespread, if iran actually gets nuclear capability, i think the risks are very high. i'm rather pessimistic because it does seem to me that one way or another, a local nuclear war could break out and has a fairly high probability of breaking out. and when it happens, if it happens, the destruction will be very great. i'm a --
. >> the u.s. economy is estate here. millions of families are counting on us to do something. look. it is the president's job, his job to find a solution that can pass the congress. he is the only one you can do it >> the president's response has been to make clear, he is already compromising. >> during the course of these negotiations i offered to compromise with republicans in congress. i met them halfway on taxes and and i met them more than halfway on spending. >> and the president address as in the briefing room tonight, he urged lawmars to go home for christmas. maybe even drink a little bit of eggnog, calmed down, cool off, week in order to try to work all this out. the president now headed to ally himself to spend christmas with his famly. on his way out the door he told us, see you next week whhch mes he is coming back before new year's eve in order to deal with this mess. lou: was named david axelrod who said see you later. it turns out mr. obama was paying attention. ed henry, fox news chief white house correspondent. president obama nominating senator john kerry to be t
information visit the author's website at evanthomasbooks.com. >> booktv on location at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland interviews professors who a also authors. we are joined by richard ruth, a professor at the naval academy. professor, what do you teach? >> predominantly asian history, and offer courses in thailand and vietnam. >> host: why important for students to know southeast asian history? >> guest: the united states is very much engaged in that corner of the world that we have many allies there. we have many partners we are working with, and many students at the naval academy, shipmen who will be officers who are going to southeast asia and remitting our interests there. i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the cultures and have knowledge of the history. >> host: well, professor ruth, a long time ally is thailand, and you wrote a book called "in buddhist company: thai soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thai land was a close ally to the united states in the vietnam war, and those familiar with
rights and continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> guest: well, the civil rights commission started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states is seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lynching or some discrimination taking place in the country. so the idea was eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to set up a civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told by one of the people who was at the meeting that he slammed the table and said there are the facts on top of the table. and commission says we know who do policy sometimes set up because there's a tough problem and people don't want to do anything about it. they get a report on it goes away. this commission was supposed to put the facts on top of the table and then its future would de
was first elected to the u.s. house in 2010. this is about 35 minutes. >> good morning and it is a great day in south carolina. it's a historic day in south carolina, because, you know, first of all, we all were saddened and surprised when senator demint told us that he was not going to continue in the u.s. senate. but i will tell you, as i've told many people, that the heritage foundation is blessed. he will lift them up to an amazing new level. it's a foundation that i have always had great respect for, and they could not have made a more perfect pick. in this decision and process that we went through, there is no replacing jim demint, there is no replacing him. there is no one that can fill his shoes. there is no one that can really carry on that torch. and i don't -- i think that says a lot about him. i think it says a lot about how he has changed the face of south carolina in the way that we have a lot to be proud of. but i also think this is a new day. and it is with great pleasure that i am announcing that i am appointing our next u.s. senator to be congressman, tim scott. [applause]
in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
on earth. there are two countries that are less friendly for new businesses than the u.s. on earth, that's guyana and the congo. [laughter] but after those two, you know, we're the least friendly place. and i summarize in the chapter a bunch of research that shows if we could just sort of fix the stupid things that we're doing, then you could add about a percent of growth to gdp growth over the next decade, and we're probably starting around 2-3. and then the second thing is right now we owe a huge amount to foreigners and are running massive deficits bigger than a trig dollars a year. if you want to -- trillion dollars a year. you probably have in your mind some idea about what goth -- government does, right? government is the parts and the defense and the people stamping offices, and everything you think of government does if we were to set it to zero right now, we would still have a deficit right now. that's how much the government is suggestion sucking out of the -- just sucking out of the economy. so what we need is spending reform that really pares back government, and as the liter
was the longest u.s. serving member. he was elected to the house of representatives in 1952 and the u.s. senate in 1958. two former staffers, ira schapiro and david corbin, talked about the senator's life. next on c-span, nikki haley. >> the first speaker is irish schapiro. -- ira shapiro. he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. se
powerful machines and he wins every election. he gets to the u.s. senate, he climbs the leadership ladder and defeats prominent liberal senators. he selected the senate whip by ousting ted kennedy. he defeated former vice president of the united states, hubert. it is always a fight for byrd. had to fight for everything he got for west virginia. he had to fight. the trouble is, what direction to take the book in? how to convey these two objectives? it came to me while sitting on the senate floor when he delivered his speech. to celebrate his 50 years of senate and the u.s. senate. the floor staff asked us to wait a few minutes since the senators were on their way there. they wanted to hear byrd talk. we discussed these incidents. he kept relating to the presidency. i worked with this president. he worked with jimmy carter. it started dawning on me -- the presidents. after the speech, it dawned on me -- no other person in american history has had an impact on so many presidential administrations. he has impacted 11 presidents. and that is 1/4 of presidents in american history. i could achie
his call for armed guards in every u.s. school. cnn's barbara starr tells us what he said and how people in high places of power are reacting to it. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> how many more? >> reporter: performers and artists now joining with 800 mayors calling for a plan to end gun violence. but wayne lapierre, the chief executive officer and public face of the national rifle association, made clear on nbc's "meet the press" that his organization will oppose legislation adding new restrictions to the sale of weapons or high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> look, i know there's a media machine in this country that wants to blame guns every time something happensism know there's an anti-second amendment industry in this town. i know there's political leads that for 20 years always try to say it is because americans own guns. i'm telling you what i think will make people safe. and what every mom and dad will make them better, they drop their kid off at school in january is if we have a police officer in that school, a good guy. >> reporter: as the last of t
byrd of west virginia. >>> back here in the u.s., the president is spending the christmas holiday with his family in hawaii. cnn's brianna keilar is there. there is no official word when he is coming back to the mainland but as that fiscal cliff deadline gets closer what do you think will happen as it rolls on? >> reporter: no official word the president will return to washington, i think that is the expectation. as you know, miguel, the senate will convene on december 27th, that's thursday. and in a perfect world, what the white house would want to see is the senate take up some sort of measure to avert the tax hikes that will hit people earning $250,000 or less. that's what they would want. that of course, would require some buy-in from senate republicans and ideally, as the white house would say that would then pass the house. now, that's lot of sort of wishful thinking, you might say, especially considering some of the pessimism we are hearing from democrats and republicans about whether the u.s. is going to go over the fiscal cliff. some folks think that perhaps senator mccon
menches who had his wish list on their wish. john hammar is out of prison and on the way home. a u.s. marine held in one of mexico's notorous prisons for mongs now back on u.s. soil and head back home for christmas. he tried to do the right thing but authorities at the border didn't see it that way. new details on his return to america and freedom. >> also we rarely hear anything from the cia about covert operations. but this movuv has the secretative organization speaking out. america's top fipefive reacting to the film of the capture of osama bin laden. the crit terof zero dark 30. >> and a shopping cart with a baby inside rolls out of a parking lot and straight into oncoming traffic . >> i am harris faulkner and we begin with a taste of freedom. an end to an ordeal that drew outrage in america. it started in august. 's 27 year old combat veteran was headed to corsa ricka on a trip. it belonged to his great grandfather. hammar attempted to clear it and they arrested him saying that the gun was illegal. they threw him in a lock up . those thungs the place. they threatened his life.
reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports that at the end of march, murders in my city had spiked almost 60%. and as of june, homicides in chicago were up almost 20% over last year. 488 murders to date. ranging from 18 months to 19 years. these
, this morning it looks like a major u.s. ally will have a new constitution, but theare still a whole lot of questions about egypt's democratic future. the draft charter has been approved by a majority of voters in a referendum. official results are expected later on. two rounds of voting followed violent protests. >>> let's check in now with cnn's ian lee. he is in cairo this morning. good morning. how was the voter turnout? >> well, randi, voter turnout was really, really low. lower than a lot of people were expecting, especially in the turmoil we saw leading up to this election. the second lowest turnout we've seen. 32% of egyptians came out and voted, which really is having a lot of people wondering where the 68% of other people weren't voting. either they were unwilling or unable to cast their votes. it really is not a strong mandate for the muslim brotherhood and president morsi. they will be happy that they won this constitution, but with such a small number of people that came out to vote, a lot of people are wondering what they could have done differently, especially with the opp
. >>> during the budget meeting, they say the u.s. needs to reexamine how the military plays a role in protecting our diplomats. at a time when our country is looming near fiscal cliff and see -- see questions station is around the bend how do you protect? he is a member of the armed services committee from california. congressman, thank you very much for joining us. >> good to be with you. >> tell us a little more about this and how we need to be protected. >> well, wree certainly going to put the -- we are certainly going to put the resources into it. last year the congress put $200 million out of the security budget for the state department. so we are going to have to find the money. we are going to have to put those resources there first for the state department, and clearly there is a role for the military. there is a quick reaction for us in the military. it needs to be ready to go. we have consulates and embassies around the world. it will be difficult to the next point and we really need the intelligence, the cia and the other resources from the military to understand what i
massacre. the group's ceo went on tv to defend his calls for armed guards in every u.s. school. cnn's barbara starr is with us, the nra has been criticized for not talking about any limitations on guns and calling for armed guards in schools and for not taking questions from reporters. >> yeah, miguel and all of that they seem to be sticking to their line. on the sunday talk shows, wayne la pierre, the chief executive officer. the public face of the national rifle association, made clear on nbc's "meet the press," his organization will continue to oppose legislationed ed adding new revikss to those weapons or the high-capacity ammunition magazines. enter la pierre had a definite view about where he thinks responsibility for some of these issues lie. have a listen. >> i know there's a media machine in this country that wants to blame guns every time something happens. i know there's an anti-second amendment industry in this town. i know there are political leads that for 20 years, always try to say it's because american-owned guns. i'm telling you what i think will make people safe.
security to the u.s. backing but he openly attacks u.s. allies accusing of america of fostering corruption in afghanistan. and worse turn coat of the year karzai. okay. most boring, pat? >> the alan green span joe lieberman trophy this year, john, goes to harry reid. >> on my side of the political agenda, mitch mcconnell is a winner. and i would also include jon huntsman, who i think had an opening to really make an impression in the republican primaries and he sure didn't. >> does mitch have a problem in kentucky? >> well, there is a singer who has her -- a senator who has her eye on his seat. >> what is she doing? >> clint eastwood's unbelievable gig at the republican convention that put he everybody to sleep and took the momentum out of that entire evening on television. >> how can you improve on that? >> i have a tie between clint eastwood's chair and donald trump. which way would you go? >> that's a tough one. most boring, the olympic opening ceremony. a showcase of all things british. harry potter, james bond, mary poppins. it paled in comparison to china's extravaganza. most charism
among latino catholics. the u.s. catholic bishops waged an active campaign against the obama administration's decision to require employers, including many faith-based employers, to provide free coverage of contraceptive services. the bishops said that would be a violation of religio freedom. the administration tried to offer a compromise, but the bishops, joined by many evangelical groups, said the compromise didn't go far enough. several religious institutions filed legal challenges to the policy. this summer, the bishops organized what they called a "fortnight for freedom" to highlight their concerns. faith-based groups continued to be divided over economic issues. conservative activists supported massive cuts to the federal budget, arguing that it's immoral to leave debt to future generations. but broad-based interfaith coalition argued that it was immoral to make cuts that would hurt the poor. to underscore that point, a group of catholic sisters organized a project called "nuns on the bus," where they crisscrossed the country speaking out against the federal budget prop
to earn interest in our participation in the city treasurer's pool. we have a small amount of u.s. treasury notes in our trust account with landfill proceeds and we continue to have an interest-free bank account, so that we don't pay fees for the most part on the bank account. the fourth report is the inception to-date. i am happy to answer questions from directors. >> any questions from directors? >> i just want to commend you all on the safety performance under this construction contract. it is pretty heavy, significant, complex work and the fact that you have continued to go through without issue. i don't know how much is attributable to being a jpla, but it's really phenomenal. it's a good model for everyone. one question on the financial report. where is the contingency for the overall project contingency tract and where would we be able to see that? >> we could start bringing you a report that shows the overall project budget. this is just the fiscal year budget. so it's just a slice of our best estimate of the overall capital budget that we anticipated to spend in this
" launched its own e-book called u.s.a. tomorrow. a publisher that any stripe can come to market very early in the timely topics of a political nature as the election season really showed, they could get the news out in a wider way within the e-book than if they had to wait several months or a year for work. i >> host: i thought michael grunwald new book, the new new deal should've gotten more attention than it did. i found it very and she seen it was not the kind of stuff you are reading the newspapers or magazines or seen discussed in tv. grunwald writes for "time" magazine. he's a nonpartisan and it's an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years fro
of other questions about the brotherhood's domestic policies in egypt but from the u.s. point of view, egypt's relationship with israel is at the center. following that, what is egypt's relationship with? morsi visited iran. i'm worried about that relationship and russian evans efforts to reestablish their ties. we're in for a worrying time in the middle east, but particularly in the relationship with egypt. >> not optimistic more 2013. embassador bolton, always good to see you, merry christmas. >> they can't to you and jamey. >> thank you so much. we have news about an international peace envoy from the u.n. headed to syria as chaos erupts. lockdarr will meet with bashar al-assad. he has had a hard time making headway in ending the civil war because neither side is interested in peace talks but he'll arrive to violence. there are reports of several people killed by a car bomb this weekend and new fighting erupted between the rebels and pro regime forces. also we're getting word there's been a bombing just crossing the wires, reuters report dozens have been killed and we'll give you m
students know about our u.s. history at grades 4, 8, and 12. everything from the united states constitution to presidents to why certain laws came into play. at very different levels, there are certain questions that are asked. the 8th graders really were the ones who did, i would say, perform the best when we consider the 4th and we consider the 12th grade. >> that's because 8th graders' scores improved over the last time the test was given. 4th graders and 12th graders did not. in fact, a majority of 12th graders turned in a poor performance. their questions were harder, and their correct answers were fewer. 55% of 12th graders scored below the basic level. what does this show? >> mm, lauren, that's not good news at all. [ chuckles ] and what does that mean for our 12th graders? it means that we have to find a way to engage our 12th graders in learning u.s. history. we have to make it more important to them. so, we have a lot of work to do, definitely, at the 12th-grade level. >> there's a famous saying -- "those who don't know history are condemned to repeat it." so, the lessons of the p
will fly now 2014. i am strongly convinced that i and the entire state understands that this is the right u.s. senator for our state and for our country. what i will also tell you -- and it is very important to me as a minority female -- that congressman scott earned this seat. he earned this seat for the person that he is. he earned this seat for the results he has shown. he earned this seat for what i know he's going to do in making south carolina and making our country proud. and so with that, i would like to introduce to you our senate- elect tim scott. >> thank you. \[applause] >> thank you. thank y'all very much. before we get started, i was thinking that this is a great day of celebration in many, many ways. but our nation still mourns. and i wanted to take a moment of silence for newtown, connecticut. if you'd join me, please. \[moment of silence] >> thank you. i will tell you that this is an exciting day for many, many reasons, but for me, the first thing i wanted to say is just thank you to my lord and savior, jesus christ, to be honest with you. \[applause] i believe that when you
, seafood boat crews and other industry workers. the b-p oil spill was one of the worst in u-s history. >> the countdown to fiscal cliff negotiations reaches the final hour. but it's already too late for your first couple of paychecks in the new year. >> no matter what congress does to address the year- end "fiscal cliff," it's already past the deadline for employers to accurately withhold income taxes from january paychecks. this means. at first workers probably won't feel the full brunt of next year's tax increases in their january paychecks. employers are planning to withhold income taxes at the 2012 rates, at least for the first one or two paychecks of the year. things change when the internal revenue service releases income tax withholding tables for 2013. >> president barack obama and first lady michelle obama are wishing americans a merry christmas and happy holidays from hawaii. the obamas departed for their vacation last night and arrived there this morning. the president says the nation should give thanks for veterans and their families and asks americans to "say a prayer for
. however a cut in spending forecast from 3.3% of growth this year to 2.5%. parts of the u.s. will get a white christmas or more. winter storm watches have been issued for parts of arkansas and oklahoma. california is already getting wet. carter evans has the forecast. >> reporter: it's been bad enough. cars-- buried if they could move at all in the midwest. in sal-- california's sierra nevada up to five feet of snow could fall. that's great news for skiers. >> we love the snow. >> reporter: not for holiday fliers. >> the only option we have is to drive. >> reporter: the most violent weather may be yet to come. and the timing couldn't be worse. >> it's going to be happening on christmas dayment and while people are with their families it looks like we're going to see a widespread severe weather outbreak across portions of the southeast and we could see multiple tornadoes. >> reporter: which concerns this meteorologist is the developing weather pattern is much like the one that caused deadly tornadoes in alabama during the spring of 2011. this new storm could also bring snow as far sout
violence in this society. just putting more deadly weapons out there. >> reporter: and as for how the u.s. would pay to put armed officers in every american school, as the nra recommends, lester, lapierre pointed the u.s. is spending billion of dollars year to train police in iraq and asked why federal dollars can't be used to train school guards here at home. >> peter alexander, thanks. another one of lapierre's claims that producers of movies, tv shows and video games are more responsible for real-life gun violence than guns themselves. from los angeles, nbc's mike taibbi takes a closer look at the issue of violence in our popular culture. >> reporter: it was a week after the explosion of gunfire in newtown that the nra's wayne lapierre called hollywood and the gaming industry enablers and co-conspirators in a culture of gun violence. >> a child growing up in america today witnesses 16,000 murders and 200,000 acts of violence by the time he or she reaches the ripe old age of 18. >> reporter: hollywood knows the poll body count is high and profitable. five of the year's top ten grossing
a few quick numbers. so in the 1970s -- this is now u.s. numbers. in the 1970s the top 1% accounted for roughly 10% of the national income in the u.s. that number now is above 25%. what's even more striking is the top 0.1% now, so 10% of the 1% is now close to 8%. so 10% of the 1% is today within sort of kissing distance of where the 1% was in the '70s. that's a pretty big shift. another way to get a sense of things is -- now not talking about income, but talking about wealth -- if you take the wealth of two admittedly hugely, hugely rich people, bill gates and warren buffett, their wealth is equal to the collective wealth of the bottom 40% of the income distribution in the united states. so two guys are equal to the bottom 120 million americans. that's also pretty big. interestingly -- and this was a surprise, you know, so i sold my book to the publishers in september 2008, just before the financial crisis. and then the crisis happened, and many people were sad, and i had a particular reason for sorrow because i thought, oh, by god, the entire premise of of my book is gone, you kno
expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. relieving the pain quickly. who helped make slea difference last yearose for thousands of california foster kids. thank you for helping foster kids. thank you for the school supplies. thank you for the new shoes. thank you, secret santa. and thank you for donating money. your generosity proves that while not everyone can be a foster parent, anyone can help a foster child. - thank you. - thank you. gracias por
into his son's school. >> gregg: we begin with so-called fiscal cliff, major concerns for the u.s. economy are not keeping lawmakers from heading home for the holidays. but with lawmakers from both parties still at odds over how to avoid that inevitable cliff, tax hikes, spending cuts associated with it, some of them are taking to the sunday talk shows to make their respective cases with just nine days until every american taxpayer feels the pinch. steve centanni, steve is there still any chance some sort of a comprehensive agreement can be reached? >> reporter: it's looking less and less likely. two sides in the did the debate had their say on sunday talk shows. there is a lot of talk and not much action. john boehner called off his public for a plan b, there has been no movement toward any kind of deal and some are saying the president wasn't to avoid that fiscal cliff. >> when i listen to the president, i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. he sees a political victory. he gets additional tax revenues and gets to cut the military which democrats have
and chained to a bed and never saw a judge. the u.s. diplomats got involved and convinced mexican authorities to release him. [ bells tolling ] three little girls, had just celebrated her seventh bitter day, a photo of the happy child wear ago green hat with glasses on the end of her nose has been published widely. services were held for 6-year-old a anna marquez green, who was remembered for a singing voice larger than her size. her father described her as beautiful and vibrant, and last but not least was 6-year-old emily parker. the lds rock cliff safe center church was filled with glitter and pink flowers, emily's favorite flower. [ bells tolling ] >> america is pausing to remember the newtown shooting victims. church bells rang out friday exactly one week after the tragedy. flags remained at half staff. many websites even went dark. people all over the country observed a moment of silence for the 20 children and 6 educators. today there is a walk for peace the national rifle association is saying that the answer is to deploy armed guards at schools. our national correspondent has more on
to helping our military eurozone. i'm joined by executive vice president and chief of staff at the u.s. thank you for joining us. we wanted to a happy story in the charity area, and you are providinthat tonight. i know everyone has heard of the uso, but the adult think everyone knows exactly what you do. help us understand. >> it's great to be here tonight, and thank you for having a sign. a uso was founded over 70 years ago by franklin delano roosevelt with the expressed purpose of lifting the spirits of troops and families. now, while we tend to focus on our constituents, which is our 2 million military members and are several million family members, we focus on, to a large degree, for groups that need us most. at think everyone would recognize these. deployed troops, those that are serving in harm's way, taking caref and protecting the freedoms that we enjoyed elite. the second group that we take care of and focus on other families of the deployed and particularly those that have had to deal with multiple the bonds. we also focus on our wounded, el, and injured service members as well as f
served as the vice president and managing director of u.s. programs for save the children. he also chairs the national commission on children and disasters, and of course he received an honorary degree from the whole the cross in 2010 and delivered the commencement address. mark, welcome. i am here to say something about the life and achievements of sergeant shriver, mark's death. summarizing his life in a few minutes is about as easy as trying to reduce the recent hurricane to a gentle breeze. his was an amazing life, and all of the work familiar with it will concur with the universally state observation that he was indeed a good man. to read his fossils' biographee is to encounter the life of a modern st. and in his eulogy in the funeral sargent shriver really was that good. he was born in 1915. his parents were social catholic justice advocates and his godfather was the cardinal james gibbons of baltimore. he was educated at yale university and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his exp
please u.s.a. plast she is the social director at the arab culture and community center and she helps hundreds of families in trans by providing social work service and is i know how important that work is and how difficult that work is and i can't thank you enough to ensure that all of our communities are cared for and ensure that all of our competency ask ins san francisco serve the arab and arab community know what to do when people walk through their doors so thank you so much vera. (applause). . >> thank you so much for your support san francisco we really appreciated it the arab community really appreciates it and tomorrow is a huge day for the community it's the beginning of the big holiday, so happy new year, (arab) thank you. you. >>> thank you vera. >> (applause). vera i do say with ask you to stay with us up here for a moment. hard work is never done alone and the best work is done in collaboration among very very strong key members in any organization. and so it's with great pride we are able to recognize someone who has been serving the community for song here in san
and able to have a .eal i honestly cannot process it. at therman his father u.s.-mexico border tonight. >> an atheist group is under in virginia after putting up some controversial billboards. .ake a look one sign says, "don't believe in god? join the club." they say the groups are meant to help the group find like- minded people. people think that we are -- but we are not. vandals have tagged one of the for signs the group as. the group has signs in a total of 33 states. >> a chilly there is a season for giving. hasn's wing organization help to d.c. families in need. one woman got the surprise of when washington and a groupn wall dropped off gifts to her home. her daughter recently died of cancer and she is now the guardian of her grandchildren. nothing can replace the loss of their mother. it will not replace it for me, a lot.will ease the pain >> gibbs is also fighting cancer. more than you hundred 50 its and will receive toys from the women's wing this holiday .eason all of the guest were donated are bought by the women who run this group. be we have anything to thankful when it co
in the u.s. on friday, that dropped to 600. by saturday, just more than 100. a few of the remaining problems were on the west coast where another storm system brought rain and snow. in the higher elevations, they struggled along highway 80. >> it is going to be worth it. >> before the 84 million expected to travel by car, the news. gas prices are down 20 cents in one month. for some families this christmas, there is even better news. she saw her daughter for the first time in nine months. >> we have been waiting and waiting. we were worried about the weather. everything worked out. we're glad to have her home. >> for them and so many others, home for the holidays never sounded so good. >> according to aaa, nearly 2 million marylanders will travel 50 miles or more for the holidays. a holiday tradition for people in denver is coming to an end. for 50 years, he has attracted millions with his desk and christmas display. this year, it reaches 70 feet high and contains about 150,000 lights. he started out with one strand. he says he is getting old and it is time to hang up the lights. so
the manufacturer is, if they're sold in the u.s., they have to comply with those standards, other countries could well have different laws on their shelves and my guess would be vary from laws that would be more health protective to less fighters to join us. >> i have two questions, i'll keep them brief. we can't control where our fire houses are and our fire house is a block off the freeway, we do replace our h fact filters every five mother and is they're jet black when we replace them every three months, it is a big concern, how do we reduce our exposure when we're a block right off the freeway, we're bumper to bump traffic, and there are some fire houses that are literally underneath the freeway so how do we reduce that exposure, air filters, if so, what kind of air filters? >> you're getting beyond our technical knowledge of our filtration, but you know, it might be somebody to consult with somebody with expertise in air filtration for indoor air of course, maybe replacing those filters more often, you know, some very basic things and again, i'm not an engineer, but wiping down surfaces wit
, the debate over the assault weapon ban and the testimony of one of the victims in the u.s. "the new york times"had this sense bowl and poignant photograph -- from our twitter page -- al joins us on the phone from new york. caller: good morning. with freedom comes great responsibility. owning a gun is a demonstration of freedom but also requires that you demonstrate responsibility for owning that weapon. i am a gun owner and i was a soldier at one time and i know what bullet can do to flesh and bone. as possibly an option, i think perhaps, like you drive a car, you have to have insurance to drive that car to protect yourself and others. perhaps we should have gun owners by a particular policy that protected from any accidents that happen. also, i think perhaps to get a gun, you need to have some kind of psychological profiling. the military does it and i was in, they call the day 201 file and to purchase the weapon, not just a background check, but have documentation that you have been counseled and you are fit to own a weapon. as far as the high-capacity magazines, no need for it. if you
, that's how many million americans are on the move this holiday weekend. nearly a third of the u.s. population boarding on planes or getting behind the wheel. many of them dealing with weather problems like this truck blown right off the road and this gas station, where the roof over the pumps was knocked down. but the big worry tonight is what happens after christmas? when everyone tries to get back home. there are two big, new storms bearing down. ginger zee is all over the story. >> reporter: relentless winds. gusting up to 60 miles per hour around the nation's capital today, put holiday travel on hold at dulles airport. >> and they actually had to have planes change runways, moving runway landings around because of concerns about crosswinds. a lot of passengers tell us they were dealing with some turbulence coming in. >> reporter: for the millions hitting the road, it was far from perfect. in rochester, new york, whiteouts made travel nearly impossible. and for those who thought trains were the safe bet, a major commuter train outside of seattle is still shut down, thanks to al
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 145 (some duplicates have been removed)